Brighter Tomorrow Guide on asking questions during a job interview

Published : 06/01/2019 07:44:38
Categories : Default

Brighter Tomorrow Guide on asking questions during a job interview

Brighter Tomorrow Guide on asking questions during a job interview

 

Overview:

 

At some point during the job interview the interviewer may ask if you have any questions. This can be a very thorny area because the wrong question can kill any chance you had in getting the job.

One strategy is to forego asking questions by stating, “Our discussion today has answered my questions.” Some feel by not asking questions it shows you have no interest in obtaining the job. From my experience interviewing for jobs and being the one interviewing, I disagree. By not asking questions, it helps to protect you and if you do it confidently, it may come across as someone who is confident.

If you are going to ask a question, make sure the question:

Does not ask something that has already been asked or explained. This shows you were not listening. Instead, ask for clarification on something mentioned or asked.

Also, avoid asking anything that will be asked once you receive the offer. These questions include, though not limited to, pay, time off, working a different schedule, and asking for exceptions to policies (e.g. working at home more than allowed by the company’s flexible working policy). Moreover avoid asking any questions that may be sensitive or may be misunderstood.

So, what should you ask?

Before attending the interview review the job description and look for potential questions. Likewise, learn all you can about the business and the people who will be interviewing you.

Ask anything that relates to job’s responsibilities that has not already been covered in the interview. This can include questions regarding:

 

  • ·        Number of people you will manage
  • ·        Personality of the team members
  • ·        Culture of the department
  • ·        Issues / challenges facing the team
  • ·        % of time expected to line manage
  • ·        Expectations for you over the next three months
  • ·        What are you expected to deliver? When?
  • ·        Why are they hiring for the role?
  • ·        Asking for clarification to something mentioned earlier in the interview.

Other questions not related specifically to the job responsibilities that you can ask includes:

  • ·        Any industry or sector trends that you feel will have a positive or negative impact on the job and how the business views them impacting your role?
  • ·        How sensitive is the job, business, and sector to economic trends? Meaning does each follow the tread, react in the opposite way, or is resistant to economic trends.
  • ·        What type of business systems will you use?
  • ·        What type of training and support will you be given?

·        What will be the turn-around on the interview? Meaning how long will you have to wait before you hear anything. Some will say be aloof and state you have other interviews. This is risky. Reason being, if the business is lukewarm about your interview then it may harm your chances. Also, some businesses may decide not to offer you the role because, they may view you as not being interested in the company and just looking for another job.

·        Positively ask questions about the company or managers. If asked, right this question can show you have a genuine interest in the company but if asked in an incorrect way, it may make you appear you will harm the business.

·        Why your interviewers enjoy working for the company? What attracted them to the business?

If you choose to ask questions, then it is important to limit your questions to no more than 3.

 

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